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Anthropology

Minor Requirements and Core Courses

The Asian American Studies Program offers a minor with classes that focus upon the history and contemporary experiences of Asian Americans and Pacific Islanders. These courses explore themes in local and ethnic history, trans-Pacific contact, cultural change and adaptation, and interethnic relations. Courses in Asian American Studies familiarized students with the historical, socioeconomic, and cultural adaptations that peoples from Asia make when coming to the United States. Students can also use the "Special Major" option to design a degree in Asian American Studies. Students work directly with the Co-Coordinators of the Program, and an Academic Advisor in another field to design a combination of classes that help students to successfully complete their "Special Major."

A strong background in ethnic studies is a significant advantage in many occupational fields, especially in an increasingly multicultural society. The Asian American Studies minor complements any major dealing with human behavior, including business, social science, education, international relations, and the human and health services professions.

Asian American Studies Minor 

Select from Category I: ASAM 15, ANTH 2, AFRS 1 (6 units)

Select from Category II: ASAM 110, ASAM 138, ASAM 140, ASAM 180T  (6 units)

Select from Category III: ASAM 151W, ANTH 123, ANTH 124, ANTH 125, AFRS 10 (6 units)

Total (18 units)

Note: The minor also requires a 2.0 GPA and 6 upper-division units in residence.

Courses

Prerequisite: G.E. Foundation A2. Historical, social, and psychological factors in the changing status and identity of Americans from Asia. Examines variables such as cultural heritage, family organization, intergenerational conflict, and the experience of racism in the changing world of Asian Americans. 

Units: 3, Repeatable up to: 3
Typically Offered: Fall, Spring
GE Area: D3

A survey of social adaptations and cultural changes among Japanese Americans in different communities such as California and Hawaii. Considers identity, marginality, acculturation, and cultural traditions in Japan and in American communities.

Units: 3, Repeatable up to: 3
Typically Offered: Fall 

Prerequisites: G.E. Foundation and Breadth Area D. A multidisciplinary study of Asian American communities and their relations with the larger society. Analyzes values, lifestyles, processes of group identity and boundary maintenance, social organization, and cultural change. Examination of Chinese, Japanese, Filipino, and other Asian American subcultures. G.E. Multicultural/International MI.

Units: 3, Repeatable up to: 3
Typically Offered: Fall, Spring
G.E. Multicultural/International MI.

This course explores the social, political, and economic issues related to the intersection of race, gender, class, and sexuality that have shaped Asian American/Asian immigrant women’s lives. Focuses on the complex relationships between local and national politics, globalized capitalism, formations of US imperialism, and individual histories of Asian American/Asian immigrant women.

Units: 3, Repeatable up to: 3
Typically Offered: Spring

Since the Immigration Act of 1965 the Asian American population has grown dramatically. This course focuses on recent issues that are facing new arrivals and supplements a history of Asian American communities. 

Units: 3, Repeatable up to: 3
Typically Offered: Spring 

Prerequisites: ASAM 15, permission of instructor. Detailed consideration of a single topic concerning the past or present position of Asian Americans in U.S. society.

Units: 3, Repeatable up to: 6

See Academic Placement -- Independent Study. Approved for SP grading.

Units: 1-3, Repeatable up to: 6
Typically Offered: Fall, Spring

Units: 3, Repeatable up to: 3

Prerequisites: G.E. Foundation and Breadth Area D. The cultural and social origins of ethnicity, and its opportunities and problems for contemporary mass societies. Offers a critical review of major theories on ethnic politics, economics, and ideology in the light of cross-cultural evidence.

G.E. Multicultural/International MI. 

Prerequisites: G.E. Foundation and Breadth Area D. An introductory survey of the cultural and historical adaptations of societies in Burma, Thailand, Laos, Cambodia, and Vietnam; and of Insular societies in Indonesia, Malaysia, and the Philippines. Examines the major effects of culture contact between East and West. 

G.E. Multicultural/International MI.

Examines cultural pluralism and considers cultural adaptations and change among minorities such as Moslems, Tibetans, and Mongolians in China, and ethnic groups of Japan and Korea. Outlines kinship, religion, organization, and technological factors in the Asiatic culture complex.

(Same as HUM 140.) Prerequisites: G.E. Foundation and Breadth Area D. Examines the current aspirations and problems of the Chinese and Japanese in terms of their traditional cultures, and explains how their histories, values, world views, and intellectual traditions affect their lifestyles and their international relations today.

G.E. Multicultural/International MI.

(Same as ASAM 151.) Treats cuisine as a systematic product of the interaction between culture and ecology. Focuses on sociocultural rather than bio-nutritional factors in the preparation and ritual implications of food in Mainland and Insular Asia. Students learn to prepare and serve a variety of Oriental dishes.